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(Audio) Friday Is American Heart Association's National Wear Red Day

02 February 2017

"Look for information about your heart health at the American Heart Association's website www.goredforwomen.org".

"Our goal this Heart Month is to educate our communities and employees about the risk factors for cardiovascular disease, the number one killer of women, causing one in every three deaths each year", said Beth Oliver, RN, DNP, Senior Vice President of Cardiac Services for the Mount Sinai Health System.

A special Go Red for Women fashion show at the luncheon will feature original fashions in red created by student designers from Texas Woman's University and the University of North Texas Fashion Design Departments. Go Red For Women advocates for more research and swifter action for women's heart health.

Fewer women than men survive their first heart attack. When you get involved in supporting Go Red For Women by advocating, fundraising and sharing your story, you save more lives. Sanford Health, El Riad Shriners and the American Heart Association are all teaming up to put it on.

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Your youth also doesn't excuse you from more "traditional" heart issues like heart attacks, clogged arteries, and strokes.

Traditionally, we think about men being the primary victims of heart disease, but each year, it claims the lives of hundreds of thousands of women. That's about one woman every 80 seconds but the good news is that 80 percent of cardiovascular diseases may be preventable through lifestyle changes and education.

In 2003, the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute launched the "Go Red for Women" campaign to bring awareness to a disease that was claiming the lives of almost 500,000 American women each year.

"We'd love to see the whole community Go Red for Women this year".