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Federation Internationale de Football Association set to ditch its poppy ban at matches

26 September 2017

Past year sparked outrage amongst the British population after world football's governing body FIFA ruled that poppies were banned from being worn in football matches because they were too political.

Effectively Fifa is about to de-politicise the poppy and as a result remove it from its forbidden list.

The new proposals will permit the wearing of poppy emblems if there is no advance objection from both the teams and the competition organiser.

FIFA is set to lift its ban on the poppy following talks with the football associations of the United Kingdom.

All four home nations defied Fifa's warnings, with England and Scotland's World Cup qualifier at Wembley on Armistice Day itself - Nov 11 - seeing both teams wear embossed armbands.

Wales and Northern Ireland were fined for displaying it in their stadiums.

The new law is expected to be passed by November's worldwide games played during the Remembrance weekend when people don Poppies.

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At the time Prime Minister Theresa May told the BBC that Fifa's poppy stance was "utterly outrageous".

The new rule will reportedly go through ahead of England's upcoming friendly against Germany, which will be played on November 10.

England is planning to play Germany in a friendly at Wembley around Armistice Day, assuming Gareth Southgate's side do not have to contest a play-off to qualify for the World Cup.

It means that England, or any other team that wants to wear poppies on their shirts, will be able to do so, providing they get their opponents' permission and inform the organisers of the match.

Writing in the Daily Mail, Charles Sale says that Fifa has "come to its senses" over the poppy dispute, while The Times says it's a "significant victory" for the English Football Association.

But now, 10 months later, Federation Internationale de Football Association has sent new guidance that appears to allow symbols and slogans that could be interpreted as political, so long as they are not related to political parties or governments.

A year ago the FA maintained that the Poppy - used since 1921 to commemorate military personnel who have died in war - did not fall into any of these categories.

Federation Internationale de Football Association set to ditch its poppy ban at matches